Panorama view of exhibition in Jedlitschka Gallery, Zurich.

Panorama view of exhibition in Jedlitschka Gallery, Zurich.

05 July 2019

Ruth Staff Brandl obituary








Ruth Staff Brandl

Ruth Staff Brandl, age 87, passed away Sunday morning June 30, 2019 in Alabama. Ruth was born September 14, 1931 in Maywood, Illinois to the late Andrew and Dorothy (Baerns) Staff. She was raised by mother Dorothy and step-father Anton Brandt in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. She attended Sheboygan area schools and graduated from North High School in 1950. Ruth married Earl B. Brandl, also of Sheboygan, on January 24, 1953 at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Sheboygan. The married couple relocated to Central Illinois, where they lived in Pekin, Illinois for many years. Earl passed away in 1980. In 1997, Ruth moved to Indianapolis, Indiana and then Spanish Fort, Alabama with her daughter Marcia Brandl Willhite and son-in-law Ronald W. Willhite, with whom she enjoyed great friendship as well as being related. Marcia was her caregiver in her battle against MDS and Leukemia, which Ruth met with her renowned, life-long positivity, sense of humor and wit.

Ruth had a rich and varied professional life as well as being a dedicated and inspirational mother. She began her work life in visual merchandizing display art for department stores. Later in life she worked in the X-Ray department at Pekin Memorial Hospital and as a Dental Assistant for Dr Joseph Aimone of Pekin.

Her life outside of employment was full and wide-ranging. In addition to remaining artistic, Ruth was a member of several Lutheran Churches, where she was active in choir, with a beautiful soprano voice, leading her to frequently be a featured soloist. She taught Sunday school, was an award-winning director of many plays with the Youth Group, and a member and officer of the Women’s Guild. She loved swimming, golfing and was also committed to dog and cat rescue. Most of all, she loved learning and was a voracious reader; she passed her love of this on to her children for which she ever-enriched their lives.

Survivors include her children Dr. Mark (Cornelia) Staff Brandl of Trogen, Switzerland; Marcia (Ronald) Brandl Willhite of Spanish Fort, Alabama; brother, LeRoy (Sylvia) Staff of Two Rivers, Wisconsin; niece Julie (Brian) Staff Swetlik, of Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin; nephew and godson Mitchell Staff of Manitowoc, Wisconsin; as well as many other relatives and friends, including her 4 treasured dogs.

A private family memorial service will be held.

Family and friends may contact Marcia Brandl Willhite or Mark Staff Brandl by mail, email, or Facebook.

In lieu of flowers please donate to and be active in animal rescue.

03 July 2019

Dr Great Art Podcast Episode 53: Dictatorship of the Consensoriat


Dr Great Art podcast Episode 53: Dictatorship of the Consensoriat

The creation of a term for one of the problems in the artworld, one very obvious usually around June each year when we all go to the Basel Art Fair, often the Venice Biennale, documenta etc. A phrase for the convenient conformity of (small) minds to have identical tastes in order to achieve hegemony.
http://drgreatart.libsyn.com/episode-53-dictatorship-of-the-consensoriat

#arthistory #consensus #drgreatart #markstaffbrandl #postmodernart

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Dr Great Art Podcast 53

Dictatorship of the Consensoriat

Hi this is Mark Staff Brandl, with the 53rd "Dr Great Art" brief podcast. I hope you enjoy it and come back for each and every one.

Today my Artecdote concerns the creation of a term for one of the positions we find ourselves in within the artworld. One of our larger problems, one very obvious usually around June each year when we all go to the Basel Art Fair, often the Venice Biennale, documenta etc.

Thinking about this, way back in 2007 I created a phrase and word within it, which I have used regularly. I would like to draw attention to it here once again, with the hope that ever more people in the artworld use it.

The phrase is "Dictatorship of the Consensoriat:"

I wish to re-introduce this word and phrase into the international artworld dialogue. Please assist me by using it every chance you get. Forming neologisms is one of my favorite diversions, especially since I learned Latin. It may be a slightly arcane hobby, but I enjoy it, and terminology can control far more of ones thought processes than we are often happy to admit — therefore, why not grab the bull by the horns and begin to develop our own phrases for what we feel it is necessary to discuss or critique. Shakespeare created words like amazement and radiance, which have become commonplace. These made-up words have stood the test of time because they expressed notions people wanted to articulate, and because they were understandable. Let's hope I can do something similar, if less inspired. In fact, Shakespeare, in his plays, sonnets, and poems, used approximately 17,677 different words —and of those 17,677 words, 1,700 were brand-new, coined by him.

While immersed in various local struggles with the regional outpost of the "consensus clans" in first Chicago then Switzerland and elsewhere, I began to see that I needed a few new terms.

My contributions usually nit-pick one or two professions unnecessarily, for the drive to the herd mentality manifests itself in all the sub-layers of the artworld currently. Therefore I began to play with Latin (rather freely and not always correctly, thus making what is known as "ML," or Modern Latin). I needed a term for the international cabal of consensus-thinkers, and I needed a phrase containing that word to express the power-control situation of the artworld since about 1987. I played with consensus, primarily, as that expresses the problem concisely. I tried to find a word expressing "those who seek only consensus" or something similar. I remembered the old Communist sententious saw, "The Dictatorship of the Proletariat." Mixing that with censor, and utilizing the similar and appropriate ending –iat, I had my term and phrase. (-at, or –ate, or –iat, is a suffix occurring in loanwords from Latin. In English the use as a verbal suffix has been extended to stems of non-Latin origin, and by way of French into the formation of certain nouns.)

I suspect I need not exactly define the group to whom I am referring, as most of us deal with them on a daily basis.

I often call them, them the "Consensus Clique." That is, a few people gathered together, who actively exclude as many others as possible (particularly artists) and tacitly agree to agree on everything. They check in with each other regularly and only promote the lowest common denominator of what they concur on. This is not a conspiracy, they say, just a very convenient conformity of (small) minds to have identical tastes in order to achieve hegemony. You can envision what I mean. The small group: including international curators who show all exactly the same few artists, no matter what the supposed theme of the show is; art bureaucrats who give all awards to the exact same people; supposed theorists who all borrow from exactly the same few recent fad thinkers (whether Lacan or Derrida or whoever is "in" now); artists who unquestioningly do boringly almost identical Late Minimalistic Neo-Concept Art; art professors who teach and force that style; everybody who bootlicks this group, etc. etc. etc. ad infinitum, ad nauseam.

However, now my improved terminology. Let them be called the Consensoriat (when they have positions of power), and let this sub-period of time at the close of Postmodernism be designated as "the Dictatorship of the Consensoriat." And let us now work on this Late Corporate Capitalist form of Academicism to bring its demise to a hasty conclusion.

That was The Dictatorship of the Consensoriat.

Thanks for listening. Podcast number 53. If you wish to hear more cool, exciting and hopefully inspiring stuff about art history and art, come back for more. Also I, Dr Mark Staff Brandl, artist and art historian, am available for live custom Performance-Lectures. In English und auf Deutsch, with Performance-Paintings!

I take viewers inside visual art and art history. Entertainingly, yet educationally and aesthetically, I analyze, underline, and discuss the reasons why a work of art is remarkable, or I go through entire eras, or indeed through the entirety of art history, or look at your desired theme through the lens of art history. The lectures often take place with painted background screens and even in my painting-installations. Most recently I did "Petr Jan Brandl, Baroque Art, Prague and Me" in Prague at the Festival Brandl.

You can find or contact me at

www.drgreatart.com/ (spell)

book me at www.mirjamhadorn.com (spell)

or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all as Dr Great Art.



10 June 2019

Dr Great Art Podcast Episode 52: Julia Kristeva, Metaphor as Resistance


Dr Great Art Podcast, Episode 52: Julia Kristeva, Metaphor as Resistance.

Julia Kristeva, the a Bulgarian-French philosopher, offers in her theorization hope for resistance against ruling ideologies within artworks themselves. Artists can produce "openings" by creating metaphors through serious play, turning rules upside down, displaying pleasure, laughter and poetry which include thoughtful critique --- delightful, anarchistic, alternative visions that are embodiments of and empower other forms of resistance.



http://drgreatart.libsyn.com/episode-52-julia-kristeva-metaphor-as-resistance

#arthistory #arttheory #metaphor #resistance #markstaffbrandl #drgreatart

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Dr Great Art Podcast 52

Julia Kristeva, Metaphor as Resistance

Hi this is Mark Staff Brandl, with the 52nd "Dr Great Art" brief podcast. I hope you enjoy it and come back for each and every one.

Today my Artecdote concerns another significant theorist whose work I find can be very inspirational to working artists. Julia Kristeva.

I have already presented Bakhtin, Feminism, Th. Emil Homerin, Cornel West, George Lakoff and others. I find Kristeva also to be very important as well as stirring.

Julia Kristeva, Metaphor as Resistance.

Julia Kristeva is a Bulgarian-French philosopher, literary critic, semiotician, psychoanalyst, feminist, and even novelist. She has lived in France since the mid-1960s. In art, she is most widely discussed in connection to the "abject," or in her battle against the Bulgarian government's accusations against her. I consider the accusations spurious and a conscious attempt by rightwingers to discredit her. The "abject" is a unique insight concerning "nasty" materials and things we find repulsive. It is somewhat abused by trendy artists and critics, but less important than her considerations concerning the possibility of resistance AT ALL to dominant ideologies.

Kristeva became influential in international critical analysis, cultural studies and feminism after publishing her first book in 1969. Her sizeable body of work includes books and essays which address intertextuality, the semiotic, and abjection, in the fields of linguistics, literary theory and criticism, psychoanalysis, biography and autobiography, political and cultural analysis, art and art history.

The effect Julia Kristeva has had on my deliberation in art theory can be summed up in four words: the possibility of resistance. As I searched the field, it appeared to me that the (then and still) dominant forms of contemporary theorizing such as Deconstructionism et al. were pathographic, seeing art as simply a symptom, forever doomed to morbidly mirror the diseases of the society surrounding it. It had not perhaps been originally so conceived, but in art critical practice, that is what the followers of Jacques Derrida in the artworld and literary world had made of his theories and those close to him. The artworld as of about 2014 noticed that the "Derrida" name has been too present and began to avoid the word --- yet they still cling to their (I would purport mis-) readings of his thought in deed if not name.

Reading Kristeva's works encouraged me in my search for a location in the creative practice itself where an "opening" could occur, where dominant tropes might be disrupted as well as expressed. This effort was an integral engine behind the origination of my exploration of theory and has become quite central to my theory of metaphor(m) and to my own artwork.

In Kristeva I saw and see the first glimmer of hope. Her form of feminism privileges opposition through a "dispersed" subject/speaker. The inherent contradiction of the process of likening one thing to another in tropes is central to my thinking.

Creators may thus be seen as those who anarchistically answer the domineering assertion of rules as the Other, as the perennial foreigner. Kristeva's philosophy can be used in this way to supplement the Bakhtinian notion of liberating alternative voices: What would those voices say? Within the often fatalistic confines of poststructuralist theory, she contrarily traces the necessity of an outlet.

John Lechte describes Kristeva's rich estimation of poetics. "It is precisely one of the features of poetic language, for example, that it embodies contradiction."

Syntax, order and rules of form are turned topsy-turvy by pleasure, laughter and poetry. In this aspect of Kristeva's thought one can see that type of incorrigible play which occurs in metaphor-making — especially in those creative tropes which question, invert or criticize metaphors which are taken for granted in our culture. There is much we can learn from Kristeva, but most of all that the individual creation of tropes is a potential avenue of great resistance.

Artists can, Kristeva-influenced, create metaphors, metaphor(m)s, through incorrigibly serious play, turn rules inside-out and upside down, create pleasure, laughter and poetry including thoughtful critique. Delightful, anarchistic, alternative visions that are embodiments of and empower other forms of resistance.

That was Julia Kristeva, Metaphor as Resistance.

Thanks for listening. Podcast number 52. If you wish to hear more cool, exciting and hopefully inspiring stuff about art history and art, come back for more. Also I, Dr Mark Staff Brandl, artist and art historian, am available for live custom Performance-Lectures. In English und auf Deutsch, with Performance-Paintings!

I take viewers inside visual art and art history. Entertainingly, yet educationally and aesthetically, I analyze, underline, and discuss the reasons why a work of art is remarkable, or I go through entire eras, or indeed through the entirety of art history, or look at your desired theme through the lens of art history. The lectures often take place with painted background screens and even in my painting-installations. Most recently I did "Petr Jan Brandl, Baroque Art, Prague and Me" in Prague at the Festival Brandl.

You can find or contact me at

www.drgreatart.com/ (spell)

book me at www.mirjamhadorn.com (spell)

or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all as Dr Great Art.

Dr Great Art Podcast Episode 51: Bluesman of Art




Dr Cornel West has described himself as a "Bluesman in the life of the mind, and a Jazzman in the world of ideas." I feel similarly, I am a Bluesman of the mind, a Rock n Roller of painting and installations, a sequential-artist/comic-book penciler of art history.

http://drgreatart.libsyn.com/episode-51-bluesman-of-art
 
#arthistory #drgreatart #markstaffbrandl #blues

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Dr Great Art Podcast 51

Hi this is Mark Staff Brandl, with the 51st "Dr Great Art" brief podcast. I hope you enjoy it and come back for each and every one. Blues Man of Art.

Today my Artecdote concerns identifying oneself as an artist, how I view my self in a kind of motto statement inspired by Dr Cornel West. I discussed him and his important ideas in passing on in various podcasts here, but I will do him more in-depth in a future episode.

First my short bit, based heavily on West's. Then I will let West do his own in his inspiringly inimitable style.

Dr Cornel West has described himself as a "Bluesman in the life of the mind, and a Jazzman in the world of ideas." I feel similarly, I am a Bluesman of the mind, a Rock n Roller of painting and installations, a sequential-artist/comic-book penciler of art history. A little densely-packed, so let me repeat it: , "I am a Bluesman of the mind, a Rock n Roller of painting and installations, a sequential-artist/comic-book penciler of art history."

And now Cornel, one of my heroes:
(recorded bits by Cornel West)

I, Mark Staff Brandl, am probably most well-known for my self-labeled "mongrel art": hybrids of installation and sequential paintings and drawings, which occasionally incorporate lectures as performances. Those being called "Dr Great Art," a part of which, podcasts, you are listening to now.

In all my artworks and even theoretical writings, I reveal and even revel in my inspirational sources, particularly those of my childhood which comprised my initial calling to be an artist. These wellsprings include the billboard sign painting and display-window decoration of my father and mother, as well as naturalistically-drawn comics and their artists, such as my personal mentor, superhero penciler Gene Colan. Furthermore, these works merge inspiration from other sources, currently including Jacopo Tintoretto, Colan, Jim Steranko and Linda Weintraub. I am after an intellectual, yet muscularly, aggressively mongrel art, using blue-collar technical skills to energize and criticize fine art, while also criticizing, honoring, and expanding the vernacular arts which inspire me. This has inherent and emphatic social practice and democratic content. I discussed Mongrel Art more in podcast number 20.

Listen to the Cornel West bits again, and please think about who YOU are as an artist or art-appreciator or art facilitator. And then compose your own sentence!

(recorded bits by Cornel West again, excerpt)

That was "Bluesman of Art."

Thanks for listening. Podcast number 51. If you wish to hear more cool, exciting and hopefully inspiring stuff about art history and art, come back for more. Also I, Dr Mark Staff Brandl, artist and art historian, am available for live custom Performance-Lectures. In English und auf Deutsch, with Performance-Paintings!

I take viewers inside visual art and art history. Entertainingly, yet educationally and aesthetically, I analyze, underline, and discuss the reasons why a work of art is remarkable, or I go through entire eras, or indeed through the entirety of art history, or look at your desired theme through the lens of art history. The lectures often take place with painted background screens and even in my painting-installations. Most recently I did "Petr Jan Brandl, Baroque Art, Prague and Me" in Prague at the Festival Brandl.

You can find or contact me at

www.drgreatart.com/ (spell)

book me at www.mirjamhadorn.com (spell)

or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all as Dr Great Art.




27 April 2019

Dr Great Art Podcast Episode 50: PETR JAN BRANDL, the Baroque and Me, a personal story






FIFTY! Dr Great Art Podcast, Episode 50: Petr Brandl, Prague and Me. The once very famous Baroque painter from Bohemia/Czech Republic and my distant ancestor. And a Festival Brandl with Geisslers Hofcomoedianten in Prague!
http://drgreatart.libsyn.com/episode-50-petr-brandl-prague-and-me
#arthistory #drgreatart #markstaffbrandl #petrbrandl #prague #baroque

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Dr Great Art Podcast 50

Hi this is Mark Staff Brandl, with the 50th "Dr Great Art" brief podcast. I hope you enjoy it and come back for each and every one. 50!

Today my Artecdote concerns PETR JAN BRANDL, the Baroque and Me, a personal story

First, this is my 50th podcast episode! Wow! Most people burnout around 12. I never thought I'd get this far. Two years. Thank you to all my listeners and especially the regulars and those who have written to me or suggested the podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!

I AM very late for this one, as I was busy with a painting-installation in an outdoor exhibition space in St. Gallen Switzerland called Hiltibold, and we are renovating a major room in our 200+ year old Swiss farmhouse, and I was presenting a Dr Great Art performance-lecture in Prague Czech Republic--- which leads us to the topic today.

There is a significant theatre company in Prague calling themselves Geisslers Hofcomoedianten (named after a theatre company from long ago, in the days of the bilingual Bohemian Kingdom in what is now the Czech Republic). They did a weekend-long Brandl Festival in the Vila Štvanice of art historical presentations, a major new theater piece and more, all concerning Petr Jan Brandl, a major Bohemian, Prague, Baroque painter and my distant relative. They were kind enough to invite me to do a Dr Great Art performance-lecture (with a painting of mine) concerning Petr Brandl and me. They were wonderful hosts, the art historians were great, and the play was spectacular.

I first visited Prague in April 1995. That was not all that long after the velvet revolution of 1989 when Communism fell there. One visual impression stays with me till today. In around 1990, I saw one of the trains from then-Czechoslovakia going through St. Gallen Switzerland. On the side, where it had clearly originally had the large lettering 'CSSR' ('Czechoslovak Socialist Republic'), it had had the third letter careful and well hand-painted-over with an 'F', ' CSFR,' the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic. Having had a father who was a proud sign-painter, that struck me especially strongly.

Back to my journey of discovery. I went with my wife and two friends to Vienna and had a great visit. Afterwards, my wife and one friend's husband had to go back to Switzerland for work, so the other friend Lamis and I went on to Prague. It is beautiful, I can greatly recommend it. At that point, 1995, it still was transitioning. Things had not been destroyed under Communism, but much had been neglected. Still, it was like a smaller Vienna. When I just went back now, 2019, most has been cleaned, updated and renovated. It was even prettier.

What did we do? We went to the famous places of which we knew. Such as the mechanical clock in the tower, the Charles Bridge, one Cubist building (among only a handful in the world.) We were staying on Starostrašnická Street. Sorry about the pronunciation . they have rows of consonants with no vowels which put even German to shame and totally befuddle and Anglophone. I insisted on going to the monument for Jan Hus. Hus, c. 1369 – 6 July, 1415, was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague. Reformer, key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation. Burned at the stake by the Pope, but an inspiration to Luther. I love Heretics and Reformers.

Let me add, I had not yet ever heard of Petr Brandl. Every time I talked to people and said my name was “Mark Staff Brandl,” they would say "You have to go to the museum!" Needless to say, I was befuddled. I am well-known as an artist, but certainly not famous enough to reach there! They were just all beginning to speak English a lot, their ancient co-language of German had died out after Habsburg oppression, two world wars against the Germans and much else, so couldn't explain much. To make a long story somewhat shorter, I went. There was a huge hall full of marvelous paintings by a once famous and major Baroque painter, Petr Jan Brandl! The people at the museum were wonderful and thrilled by my name. They gave me a book and a postcard, all they then had. I begged to pay for it, but they refused!

The book is in Czech, however, I sent photocopies of the postcard to much of my family. Back came rumors --- family said, "oh yeah, we had heard there was some old artist there from the family, etc." I was astounded. Hey, I am the Dr of art history and an artist, why hadn't I heard anything?! My family has a history of artisans, such as goldsmiths, etc. including my artist, designer, display, sign-painter parents, but no known fine artists until me. I was thrilled and started to research. My sister Marcia, by the way, is still researching, had DNA done and so on, although mostly about my Mom's Volga German ancestry. More about that, perhaps, in a later podcast.

After much research, he appears to be my great, great, great, great, great, great, great uncle.

This all fits well into one of my ideé fixe, almost a bête noire, obsessions --- that is, the importance of art history, but the importance of critiquing it and expanding it as well!

So --- Where is Eastern European Art? Heck, I am a PhD in Art History, an artist, as I said, and he is my relative --- and he was famous and important --- and I had never heard of him?!!

But of course also, where are women and Africa, and South-East Asia, and Folk/Popular Culture and and and and …….

Dr Great art and all of us have A LOT to do!

Here is a Super Short History of Petr Brandl. I will refer to him mostly here as "Petr," which is unusual in English in history, as we use last names. But since it sounds odd, because it is also my name, I will use his first name. Brandl talks about Brandl doing this and that.

Petr Jan / Jan Petr / Johannes Peter BRANDL

- born Prague 24. Oct. 1660
-died Kutná Hora 24. Sept. 1735

6th Child of
father Michal Brandl, a tailor and pub-owner, Bohemian German
mother Alžběta Hrbková, a Czech from Bohemian Přestanice

Petr dropped out of Jesuit grammar school.

He then served an apprenticeship with court painter Kristián Schröder
This served as Petr's introduction to the world of art: Italian, Dutch, Flemish and Czech art
And to King Leopold I,. Petr was hailed as “The next Karel Škréta” (a wonderful Czech Baroque painter of the 17th century).

Petr Brandl, had a “Bohemian” lifestyle, (bohémien), as well as being an actual Bohemian. (I'll explain the origin of that word in a future podcast.) Petr was, and I quote, ---

- “Irresponsible,”

- Frequented pubs of ill-repute,

- Lived in noble residencies but also spent some short time in jail,

- He abandoned his wife Helena and their three children and paid no alimony for a long time,

- Sometimes took years to finish paintings already paid-for (shades of Leonardo)

- Left debts when he died for tobacco, wine, pigment, even rackets and balls

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Petr Brandl had several periods in his artistic oeuvre, decades usually.

Early

- Petr Brandl, Baptism of Christ, very Tintorettoesque to me

- 1715–1716

- Church of St. Jana Křtitele, Manětín

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Collaboration

with sculptor Matyás Braun,

- Matyás Braun (& Petr Brandl)
c. 1710
Statue of St. Lutgardis, Charles Bridge

- Petr did the planning and reference drawings for Braun.

------------------

1720s Petr reached a unique balance, but with much drama, very Baroque

- Petr Brandl, 1721, Adoration of the Magi

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Then came the amazing portraits, considered to be influenced by Jan Kupecký

- Portraits, of Apostles, living people, and a few genre paintings

- The portraits of the apostles are nowadays once again reaching wider levels of appreciation in art history, and they are indeed beautiful

-----------------------

Self-Portraits

- Only a handful, but truly great



His funeral in Kutná Hora was as dramatic as his paintings.

The Cistercians from Sedlec, the Jesuits from Kutná Hora, the town council, the Mining Authority and about 300 miners with lamps shining paid tribute to the painter who was laid to rest in the Church of the Virgin Mary.

--------------------

Andrea Steckerová, the illustrious curator of the Collection of Old Masters of the National Gallery in Prague spoke at the Festival Brandl, gave me a grand new book she spearheaded concerning Petr, and in English! As she describes, professional interest in Petr Brandl even in the Czech Republic temporarily subsided after the death in 2001 of Jaromír Neumann, the most noted authority on Brandl’s work till then. The book is titled Petr Brandl 1668–1737 Studies. Andrea Steckerová (ed.) 700 Czech korunas, that's 31 Swiss francs or US $ 31.00.

Eleven extensive essays written by middle and younger generations of scholars who deal with unique aspects of the art of Petr Brandl, reflecting Neumann's earlier work, but also newer results from recently discovered artworks and archival material. 350 pages, 250 reproductions. A huge, impressive volume, especially for so little cost.

Baroque painter, Petr Brandl, will doubtless once again become a world-famous artist and his works will attract visitors. Appreciation of his, and other, Baroque painting in Bohemia / Czechia and will broaden the views of the 17th and 18th centuries.

We need more knowledge of Petr Brandl in English and in German and in other languages and cultures! Help Andrea Steckerová and me promote Brandl and Prague in Western Europe, Switzerland, Germany, and the UK and US!

----------------------------

That was Petr Brandl and Me. I will say more about the Festival and theatre and all in another podcast. But let me publicly thank Kateřina Bohadlová, Petr Hašek, Seňor Bohousch, and all the others!

Thanks for listening. Podcast number 50. If you wish to hear more cool, exciting and hopefully inspiring stuff about art history and art, come back for more. Also I, Dr Mark Staff Brandl, artist and art historian, am available for live custom Performance-Lectures. In English und auf Deutsch, with Performance-Paintings!

I take viewers inside visual art and art history. Entertainingly, yet educationally and aesthetically, I analyze, underline, and discuss the reasons why a work of art is remarkable, or I go through entire eras, or indeed through the entirety of art history, or look at your desired theme through the lens of art history. The lectures often take place with painted background screens and even in my painting-installations.

A recent one, as discussed here, was on Petr Brandl, the Prague Baroque artist and my distant relative, which I gave in Prague, Czech Republic!

You can find or contact me at

www.drgreatart.com/ (spell)

book me at www.mirjamhadorn.com (spell)

or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all as Dr Great Art.